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Edward Snowden’s Message is Being Buried in Mud

Honestly, do some people actually think this is plausible? “I’m tired of sun and beautiful beaches, I hate my job and I want to break up with my girlfriend, but I hate uncomfortable conversations — I know!  I’ll become a whistleblower and go on the run!  I’d rather be hunted by the government than my ex.” It would be funny if it weren’t so deadly serious.

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My television, Internet news pages, and Twitter timeline are filled with hit pieces on Edward Snowden — he’s an egotist, a narcissist, an opportunist; he’s in it for the money, or the glory; he’s out to embarrass the President; he’s a spy, a mole, a traitor.  I see these pronouncements and shake my head.  The narrative has quickly moved away from the abhorrence of the PRISM program and the Cthulu-esque tentacles of the Patriot Act reaching into every area of our lives, and focused squarely on Edward Snowden and all his personal idiosyncracies.  It’s classic “kill the messenger” — pay no attention to the government spying on you from behind the curtain.  Yes, he’s arrogant; arrogance doesn’t make the truth less true.  Stephen Hawking, Keith Olbermann, Salman Rushdie, Christopher Hitchens, Steve Jobs — all people I deeply admire, and all of them incredibly cocky.  Their conceit doesn’t make them any less brilliant or less talented, and if they make a correct assessment of a theory or a person or a political situation, their braggadocio does not make their deductions any less accurate.

“He’s in it for the money.”  He was making as much as $200,000 a year, what he himself described as living “very comfortably.”  I wouldn’t use that term to describe his life now.  “He’s in it for the glory.”  He’s being vilified by the world and hunted by the U.S. government — where’s the glory?  “He was dissatisfied with his life and this was his way out of it.”  Well that one is hard to argue with. A high school dropout with a patchwork college education and an online degree who found himself making between $100,000 and $200,000 a year, living in paradise with a girlfriend who can put her ankles behind her ears — yeah, that life must have been hell.

Honestly, do some people actually think this is plausible?  “I’m tired of sun and beautiful beaches, I hate my job and I want to break up with my girlfriend, but I hate uncomfortable conversations — I know!  I’ll become a whistleblower and go on the run!  I’d rather be hunted by the government than my ex.”  It would be funny if it weren’t so serious; so deadly serious.

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“He’s out to embarrass the President.”  I think the President has every reason to be embarrassed; he’s been called on his own double-dealing.  If you trash a hotel room and another guest informs the management, did that person do it to embarrass you?  Perhaps.  Perhaps he simply wanted the proprietor to know that there’s a mess in his establishment.  If that embarrasses you, it’s probably because it should.

Snowden  said some really stupid stuff online.  Okay folks, let’s pause for a moment and take a good long look back at our online activity over the years:  who hasn’t, at least once in their life, been an ass on a forum or an online chat?  Funny, I’m not seeing many hands — the ones I am seeing, I’m calling you all out right now as liars.  Everyone has; it’s the GIFT that keeps on giving.  Add to that the fact that Ed Snowden fancied himself a hacker — not the best of online company, and we’re lead right back to the first argument:  just because someone is a colossal pain in the ass doesn’t affect the veracity of their statement once it’s proven.  And this is not even taking into account that he said this stuff six years ago, when he was 24.  I know I was a much different person at 30 than I was at 24, and it’s not outside the realm of possibility that he underwent an ideological transformation during that time.  I would hope Mr. Snowden has matured at least somewhat during those six years.

“He’s a traitor.”  This is the one that twists my gut the most.  What makes Edward Snowden a traitor, and Bradley Manning a hero?  Both revealed horrendous violations perpetrated by our government, and both should be hailed for it.  The difference is that Manning’s revelations were against the Bush administration; Snowden’s are against Obama’s.  If Edward Snowden’s information had come out against Bush and his enablers, he would be elevated to the same exalted position of political martyr as Manning.  But Snowden made the mistake of pointing out that the Emperor’s new clothes aren’t as new as we thought, that the man who once loudly denounced the Patriot Act has not only embraced it, he’s put it on steroids.  Snowden’s great sin was revealing that Barack Obama is a politician — no more, no less.

It’s a classic tactic:  we can’t stand the irrefutable facts pummeling us in the face so we deflect them by taking out the deliverer, distract the public from the truth with down-and-dirty character assassination.  It shouldn’t matter whether or not Edward Snowden is as pure as his surname implies or if he’s the biggest jerk to walk to earth, because he is not the story, his facts are; and by putting the focus on Snowden and his flaws we are burying the lede, which is just how the key players at the top want it.

Truth is truth, whether it’s brought to you by a sinner or a saint, and an immoral act is always immoral, whether it’s being perpetrated by a Republican or a Democrat.  What happened to all the liberals who decried the Patriot Act?  Under Bush, it was a travesty, an outrage, a naked power grab and an unacceptable violation of rights.  Now that act is being utilized by a Democratic president, and many of those same liberals turn a blind eye.  You cannot ignore truth simply because it does not fit your narrative.  Liberals often refer to the Fox Bubble, the impenetrable barrier that hardline conservatives have swaddled themselves with, keeping them blissfully protected from any information which threatens their narrow view of the world.  The revelation of PRISM has shown that the other side is not immune to the Bubble Effect, or at least to the practice of clapping their hands over their ears and chanting “La la la” to keep from hearing truth they don’t want to face.  “The Daily Show” host Jon Stewart once said “If you don’t stick to your values when they’re being tested, they’re not values — they’re hobbies.”  Sadly, I’m seeing a lot of progressive icons being revealed as mere hobbyists, as opportunistic as they accuse Edward Snowden of being.  It’s deeply disappointing to see people you admire revealed as sycophants at best, hypocrites at worst.

Edward Snowden is being tried and convicted in the court of public opinion for being a turncoat, a political hack, and an arrogant ass, his real crime though, of being the bearer of an inconvenient truth is far more unsettling.

External links & references

  1. Edward Snowden:  ‘The US government will say I aided our enemies’
  2. Daniel Ellsberg:  NSA Leaker Snowden Made the Right Call When He Fled the US
  3. Edward Snowden’s Whistleblowing Saga Mirrors the Karen Silkwood Case
  4. John Cusack, Free Press Rallying to Demand NSA Accountability

Shannon Daley has been hanging around online corners for over twenty years. She contributes on an American's perspective, on politics, culture and technology. Location: Southwest by South.

American Eye

Digital Killed the Analog (Music) Star: The Death of the Mixtape

No one makes mixtapes anymore. It’s heartbreaking. As a teenager I was the mixtape queen. I had
high_fidelity_coverrather exotic musical tastes for my small town and I delighted in putting together the more obscure selections of my cache for friends, friends of friends, acquaintances — anyone who would ask, really.

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A few months back I had a discussion with a friend about music: what we were listening to now, how our tastes had changed over the years, and so on. At the close of the conversation my friend said “Next time we get together, can I go through your phone and pick out some songs?”

This was just the bait I’d been waiting for, and eagerly I jumped at it: “Why don’t I make you a CD and you can burn it to your iTunes?”
He looked at me as though I were an obsolete relic from the 1980s pulled from the Atari landfill. “Or I can just rip your whole collection directly from your phone. I have an app.” I grappled with the urge to sigh.

“The making of a great compilation tape, like breaking up, is hard to do. It takes ages longer than it might seem. You gotta kick it off with a killer to grab attention. Then you gotta take it up a notch. But you don’t want to blow your wad. So then you gotta cool it off a notch. There are a lot of rules.” — “High Fidelity”

No one makes mixtapes anymore. It’s heartbreaking. As a teenager I was the mixtape queen. I had
rather exotic musical tastes for my small town and I delighted in putting together the more obscure selections of my cache for friends, friends of friends, acquaintances – anyone who would ask, really. It was a point of pride for me that I had stuff that no one else had, and to truly be in the know musically they had to come to me. Pride, and a certain amount of bragging, was the first reason I made mixtapes, and I suspect it’s the same for most people. It’s the same reason people invest in eardrum-shattering sound systems for their cars, and why they blare the music from those systems at maximum with all their windows open: “This music is who I am and I want you to know it. Recognize my impeccable taste! Revel in my utter coolness!”

Barry: Here’s the thing. I made that tape special for today. My special Monday morning tape for you. Special.
Rob: Well it’s f***in’ Monday afternoon, you should get out of bed earlier!
— High Fidelity

Later, of course, my mixtapes went from merely sharing my offbeat music with random people to trading more symbolic playlists with selected friends. At first it was just my favorite songs, the ones with lyrics that spoke to my personal Sturm und Drang (needless to say, there were a lot of Smiths tracks on my mixes). Once those were absorbed and accepted, we would up the stakes by making themed compilations — love and death featured heavily. My personal favorite — and typically the most risky as far as maintaining one’s coolness factor was concerned — was the guilty pleasures mix. You really put your reputation on the line with these, and only the most trusted friends were privy. In my experience, the guilty pleasures mix is the most revealing of all compilation tapes. All pretenses of cool are dropped and you get to see what really makes a person tick, or dance, or sing loudly (and badly) in the car. Besides, where else are you going to hear Wham!, Frank Stallone, Olivia Newton-John, and Tony Joe White back-to-back-to-back? A no-holds-barred guilty pleasures mix is a thing to behold. Have a few friends over, play the cheesiest selections from everyone’s iTunes, add copious amounts of alcohol, and you’ve got yourself an awesome get-together.

Now, the making of a good compilation tape is a very subtle art. Many do’s and don’ts. First of all, you’re using someone else’s poetry to express how you feel. This is a delicate thing.High Fidelity

Then there’s the love mix. I don’t know anyone that hasn’t, at one time or another, made a mixtape for a boyfriend, girlfriend, potential romantic interest, or infatuation. These were the mixes that were themost thought-out, the most angst-ridden. After all, you had to find just the right blend of romance and lust to convey all the feelings you were either too shy, too embarrassed, or too scared to reveal in your own less-than-poetic, barely-articulate lovestruck words, especially in the case of an unrequited crush. These were almost always delivered via third party, after which you waited for days in a state of anxious anticipation for word to come back from the object of your desire, good, bad, or indifferent. It was the artsy teenager’s version of the note passed in class that read “Do you like me? Check yes or no.” Of course, the love mix can backfire on you — today’s romantic compilation is tomorrow’s heartbreak mix when you split up. To this day, there are songs I can’t bear to listen to because they were part of a mixtape made for me by an ex-boyfriend. The feelings for the men are long gone, but the music still manages to find the scar tissue from those breakups and poke at it like needles.

[“If You Leave Me Now” by Chicago comes on the juke box] Ed: [glaring at the juke box] Who the hell put this on?
Shaun: [With tears in his eyes] It’s on random.
“Shaun of the Dead”

It’s amazing how much power lies in the choosing and arrangement of a dozen or so songs: the power to impress, to inform, to invite, to take the art of others, which has moved you, and create a new and unique expression of your very own with the hope of affecting others. But the mixtape is a dying art form, slowly suffocated by the cold and dispassionate efficiency of 21st century technology. It’s easier just to upload your entire music catalog to someone’s computer or mobile device without thought or meaning, and for the recipient to scroll through a playlist and pick-and-choose what suits them, which makes it an ineffective delivery method. Even if you did take the time to assemble a compilation for a friend, would they have the time and patience now to listen?

The memories of those long-ago mixtapes fills me with a wistful longing for the good old days of cassette tape in all its analog splendor. Perhaps I’ll begin a new mixtape, songs from the past for the person who is as nostalgic for the art of compilation as I am. And who knows — there might actually be such a person out there.

External Links & References

  1. High Fidelity, 2000 @ IMDB
  2. The Mixtape (explained) : Wikipedia
  3. Mixtape History @ MTV.com

 

Image credit:8trackmixtape by Original uploader was Teamgoon at en.wikipedia – View original.

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American Eye

Help! My Doctor is a Conservative.

My doctor, as it turns out, is a Republican. And not just any Republican. He is, it appears, one of the GOP’s go-to guys in their war against the Affordable Care Act. He has testified before Congress, written several op-eds for prominent conservative publications and blogs, and is a frequent guest on right-wing radio. This guy is no lightweight. I felt a sinking feeling in my gut, and the more I read, the worse that feeling became.

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When I was a young college student, my father and I spent many hours discussing world events and debating politics.  My father was a hardline Republican – were he alive today, I have no doubt that he would be a Tea Party affiliate and a vocal Birther.  I, on the other hand, was proudly liberal and a newly registered Democrat. Despite our repellent indubitable beliefs our discussions were never angry or ugly.  He never berated me or talked down to me. He never told me I was wrong for believing as I did. When I voted for the first time in my state’s Democratic primary, it was my father who offered to drive me to the polls. That type of civility in political discourse is hard to come by these days.  Both sides deal with the other with open derision and hostility, and it gets worse every year.  Is it possible in this divisive political climate to be completely politically opposed to a person and still like them?  How much trust could you put in someone whose beliefs were a photo negative of your own?

I recently needed to reach my orthopedist’s office, and not being able to locate his number amongst my paperwork, I took to the internet. What I saw was, to say the least, surprising.  My doctor, as it turns out, is a Republican.  And not just any Republican.  He is, it appears, one of the GOP’s go-to guys in their war against the Affordable Care Act. He has testified before Congress, written several op-eds for prominent conservative publications and blogs, and is a frequent guest on right-wing radio.  This guy is no lightweight.  I felt a sinking feeling in my gut, and the more I read, the worse that feeling became.

At that point I began to think to myself, should I find a new doctor?  My health was in his hands; my future mobility was dependent upon his care.  How fully could I trust this man, whose opinions on the subject of healthcare I so vehemently opposed?  But my earlier visits with him had been good ones — he was taking good care of me, and I couldn’t deny that my healing was progressing well under his care.  I know many doctors who, upon seeing the extent of my injuries, would not have hesitated to put me under the knife.  My doctor, however, had balked at immediately ordering surgery, opting instead to see how my body healed itself under its own power, a decision that turned out to be the right one.  On top of all this, I actually liked him.  He was a nice guy!  Pleasant, good-natured, and he didn’t exude an air of superiority to me the way many doctors can.  In the end, I decided to take the high ground:  I’ve kept him as my orthopedist, and I haven’t regretted it.  The fact that I am almost completely back to my pre-injury self today is testament to his expertise.

Would he be as forgiving of me if he were privy to my political views?  I don’t know, but I like to think so.

I have to believe that in this age of political hostility, some of us can put aside our differences for a while, for our own mutual benefit as well as the benefit of others.  It’s nice to know that at least I still can.

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American Eye

How a Broken Ankle Nearly Broke My Mind

I hadn’t written in over two months. The ideas came but the words would not follow. They just hung in my mind, disjointed fragments that I could not string together. Like the shoes you sometimes see hanging from electrical wires, you know how they got there but retrieving them is impossible.

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I hadn’t written in over two months.  The ideas came but the words wouldn’t follow, instead hanging in my mind; disjointed fragments that I just could not string together.  Like the shoes you sometimes see hanging from electrical wires, you know how they got there but retrieving them is impossible.  Writers block is something that plagues everyone who writes regularly, and for most it’s an elusive, unexplainable thing.  For me, my block had an obvious, tangible cause, as plain as the nose on my face — or the foot on my leg.

Days after writing my last piece, I suffered an accident in which I seriously injured my left ankle.  I knew the moment it happened that something was definitely amiss, but ten hours later (six of those spent in emergency) I discovered just how extensive the damage was: comminuted avulsion fractures of the distal fibula and calcaneus, with a minor fracture of the talus and a 9mm displacement of the cuboid. In layman’s terms, I had shattered my ankle and done a fair bit of damage to my foot.  Two days later an orthopedist swapped out my temporary splint for a lovely purple fiberglass cast, told me to stay completely off my foot for the next four weeks, at which time I may or may not need surgery to repair my shattered bones, gave me a prescription for pain medication and sent me on my way.

At first, the whole thing was amusing — my klutziness now had a body count!  Even the incident itself was ridiculous:  I had tripped and fallen down a step that was all of two inches high.  I didn’t even have a story to tell!  And there was a certain amount of novelty to it.  I had a relatively illness-, pain-, and injury-free childhood.  I never contracted chicken pox, measles, mumps, nothing more serious than tonsilitis and one food allergy reaction; I’d never broken a bone, sprained an ankle, jammed a finger, required stitches, or taken a ball to the head. The one and only time I fell off my bike (I went hurtling down a hill straight into a thorn bush) I was left with a few scratches and bruises and nothing more.  And with the exception of easily-treated injuries to my back and knees and one minor surgery, my adult life had followed suit.  So this broken ankle of mine was entrance into a club of sorts.  I could now empathize with all the tales of broken bones I had heard from my friends.  That feeling lasted about twenty-four hours.  Then the reality set in:  I was hurt, badly enough that I had been sidelined, and for how long no one could say.  My life as I had known it was now put on hold, and everything now centered upon my injury and the healing process.  And this, I was to discover, was even more painful than the initial injury.

My spring semester in college, which was supposed to be my “gap semester” spent taking all the fun courses I hadn’t had time for the year before, was ended before it even began.  My gym routine and my plans to begin running came to a screeching halt.  My rose garden sat neglected and bloomless without my daily ministrations.  The trip I had planned to take during spring break was now indefinitely shelved. No movies, no shopping, no lunches with friends.  Even being able to go to the kitchen by myself was vetoed by my mother after catching the leg of my walker led to a second fall three weeks later.  I hesitated to venture anywhere that I might encounter an obstacle.  My world had shrunk to an area of roughly 20 feet.  The days were endless, and the loss of autonomy was maddening.  For my birthday, I received a wheelchair.  I didn’t know whether to laugh or cry.  When my cast came off four week later and I was fitted with a fracture boot, I was devastated to learn that I was not as healed as I’d hoped:  although I would not require surgery, walking again was going to take much more time than I had thought, and I was plunged into a chasm of depression the depths of which I had not experienced since my teens. My distaste for self-pity only served to make it worse.  It was the darkest point in a tunnel whose end I could not yet discern.  But, I thought to myself, at least now I have plenty of time to read or write.  That turned out to be easier said than done as I found my mind consumed with the mechanics of everyday life.

Things that we all do every day by rote I now had to carefully plan out.  Things as simple as dressing and bathing became meticulously plotted procedures.  Navigating the step at my front door on the few occasions when I left my house became drama-filled affairs.  This left precious little room in my brain for anything else.  Topics to write about came to me often, but this became an annoyance rather than a welcome distraction.  They were an itch I could not scratch.  I tried to read but when I went back later to my stopping point, I found I couldn’t remember what I’d previously read.  Mindless television and Angry Birds were all the diversion my poor taxed brain could handle.  Any intellectual thoughts I had were barricaded behind a wall of mundane routines, and that wall became more impenetrable every day.  I began to wonder if, like my unexercised leg, my writing muscles would atrophy to the point of becoming completely useless.

But time heals all wounds, and my poor shattered ankle is no exception.  Fittingly, on the first day of spring, the end of the long dark winter of my discontent finally came in sight:  I took my first halting steps in over two months.  My walker was retired and a cane took its place. And with that simple transition, the wall began to crumble and finally, at long last, the words began to tumble free.  The mercury pushed spring forward into summer and my fabulous taskmaster of a physical therapist pushed me forward along with it.  I’m now cane-free and, for the most part, pain-free.  I’m walking again, living self-reliantly again, and thankfully I’m writing again.  And as it turns out, there was a story to tell after all.  I just had to wait for the words to come.

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Thanks to Dave Shea for X-Ray image.

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